Types of Document

Type of Document differentiate between the different structures and forms of printed and handwritten source. The following types are provided to assist clients to put their source material into categories that will generally suggest the level of tagging and possible materials. For example, types like poetry or dictionaries would generally require more tagging than a common book type, due to the more granular nature of lines versus paragraphs, etc. Though the factors of typeface, legibility, and condition determine in large part the price of digitization, the volume and intensity of tagging does have an effect upon the overall cost. Many of the following types have similar enough tagging structures that the price will not vary much between them, but they are differentiated for the purpose of the specific tags that accompany each content class.

Click on the below items to show samples

Books status

Books generally contain printed paper bound in a spine, with chapter divisions that build on each other’s content, whether they are fiction (such as novels) or non-fiction (such as academic textbooks.)

Sample Image

Click image to enlarge

Sample XML

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<?oxygen RNGSchema="tei_tite.rnc" type="compact"?>
<!DOCTYPE text SYSTEM "file:/C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/crana/Desktop/TEI/Washington%20Univ/dtd/tei_tite.dtd">
<text xml:id="book">
<div1 type="chapter" n="1">
<pb n="2" fasc="Exhibit_book.png"/>
<head type="main">THE JUNGLE BOOK</head>
<!-- assuming it first chapter -->
<p>that they may never forget the hungry in this world.”</p>
<p>It was the jackal—Tabaqui, the Dish-licker— and the wolves of India despise Tabaqui because he runs about making mischief, and telling tales, and eating rags and pieces of leather
from the village rubbish-heaps. They are afraid of him too, because Tabaqui, more than any one else in the jungle, is apt to go mad, and then he forgets that he was ever afraid of any one, and runs through
the forest biting everything in his way. Even the tiger hides when little Tabaqui goes mad, for madness is the most disgraceful thing that can overtake a wild creature. We call it hydrophobia, but they call it <i>dewanee</i>—the madness—and run.</p>
<p>“Enter, then, and look,” said Father Wolf, stiffly;“but there is no food here.”</p>
<p>“For a wolf, no,” said Tabaqui; “but for so mean a person as myself a dry bone is a good feast. Who are we, the Gidur-log [the Jackal People], to pick and choose?” He scuttled to the back of the cave, where he found the bone of a buck with some meat on it, and sat cracking the end merrily.</p>
<p>“All thanks for this good meal,” he said, licking his lips. “How beautiful are the noble chil-</p>
</div1>
</text>

Dictionaries status

Dictionaries contain the known words within a formal language set, with entries that detail how a word is pronounced, defined, and used within different speech situations.

Sample Image

Click image to enlarge

Sample XML

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<?oxygen RNGSchema="tei_tite.rnc" type="compact"?>
<text xml:id="directory">
<div1 type="dictionary">
<pb n="6" fasc="Exhibit_Dictionaries.tif"/>
<head type="main">A DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE.</head>
<div2 type="a">
<head type="main">A</head>
<div3 type="page">
<p><label>A (ā).</label> <desc>The indefinite article, contracted from an, used before nouns singular beginning with a consonant sound ; any ; every ; one.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-back' ([unk]-bǎk')</label>, <desc>adv. Backward ; by surprise ; unexpectedly.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab'a-cus (ǎb'[unk]-k[unk]s)</label>, <desc>n. A counting frame ; the uppermost member of a pillar.</desc></p>
<figure>
<graphic url="images/dictionary_fig1.png"/>
<ab type="caption">Abacus.</ab>
</figure>
<p><label>A-baft' ([unk]-b[unk]ft')</label>, <desc>adv. & prep. Toward the stern ; astern.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-ban'don ([unk]-băn'dŭn)</label>, <desc>v. t. To give up wholly ; to forsake. — A-ban'doned (-dŭnd), a. Given up to vice ; corrupt. — A-ban'don-ment, n.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-base' ([unk]-bās')</label>, <desc>v. t. To bring low ; to degrade ; to humble. — A-base'ment, n.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-bash' ([unk]-bǎsh')</label>, <desc>v. t. To make ashamed ; to shame ; to confuse. — A-bash'ment, n. A-bate' ([unk]-bāt'), v. t. To diminish ; to lessen. — v. i. To decrease ; to become less. — A-bate'mont, n. An abating ; decrease ; deduction.</desc></p>
<p><label>‖A'bat'toir' ([unk]/b[unk]t/twär')</label>, <desc>n. A slaughterhouse.</desc></p>
<p><label>‖Ab'bé' ([unk]b'b[unk]')</label>, <desc>n. [F.] An ecclesiastic devoted to teaching, literature, etc.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab'bess (ǎb'běs)</label>, <desc>n. A governess of a nunnery.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab'bey (ăb'b[unk])</label>, <desc>n. ; pl. ABBEYS (-bĭz). A monastery or convent.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab'bot (ǎb'bŭt)</label>, <desc>n. The head of a society of monks ; superior of an abbey.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab-bre'vi-ate (ǎb-brē'vĭ-āt)</label>, <desc>v. t. To shorten ; to abridge ; to condense. — Ab-bre'vi-a'tion (-ā'- sh[unk]n), n. A shortening ; contraction.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab'di-cate (ǎb'dĭ-kāt)</label>, <desc>v. t. To relinquish ; to give up. — v. i. To give up an office. — Ab'dica'tion (-kā'sh[unk]n), n. Abandonment of office.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab-do'men (ǎb-dō'měn)</label>, <desc>n. Belly. — Ab-dom'inal (-dŏm'ĭ-nal), a. Pertaining to the abdomen.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab-duce' (ăb-dūs')</label>, <desc>v. t. [ABDUCED (-dūst') ; ABDUCING.] To draw away. — Ab-duct' (-d[unk]kt'), v. t. To take away by force. — Ab-duc'tion (-dŭk'sh[unk]n), n. An abducing or abducting.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-beam' ([unk]-bēm')</label>, <desc>adv. On the beam ; in a line at right angles to the ship's length.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-bed' ([unk]-běd')</label>, <desc>adv. In bed, or on the bed.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-bet' ([unk]-bĕt')</label>, <desc>v. t. [ABETTED ; ABETTING.] To encourage ; to instigate ; to incite.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-bey'ance ([unk]-bā'ans)</label>, <desc>n. State of suspense.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab-hor' (ǎb-hôr')</label>, <desc>v. t. [ABHORRED (-hôrd') ; ABHORRING.] To regard with horror ; to loathe ; to detest. — Ab-hor'rence (-hǒr'rens), n. Detestation ; great hatred. — Ab-hor'rent (-hǒr'rent), a. Abhorring ; repugnant ; inconsistent.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-bide' ([unk]-bīd')</label>, <desc>v. i. [ABODE (-bōd'); ABIDING.] To continue in a place ; to dwell. — v. t. To await ; to endure ; to bear.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-bil'i-ty ([unk]-b[unk]l'[unk]-t[unk])</label>, <desc>n. Power ; skill.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab'ject (ăb'jěkt)</label>, <desc>a. Mean ; base ; despicable. — n. One in a miserable state. — Ab-jec'tion (-jěk'sh[unk]n), n. Baseness ; low state.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab'ju-ra'tion (ǎb'j[unk]-rā'shŭn)</label>, <desc>n. An abjuring.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab-jure' (ǎb-jūr')</label>, <desc>v. t. To renounce on oath ; to disclaim solemnly ; to recant. — Ab-jur'er, n.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-blaze' ([unk]-blāz')</label>, <desc>adv. On fire ; highly excited.</desc></p>
<p><label>A'ble (ā'b'l)</label>, <desc>a. Having power ; strong ; capable. — A'bly (-bl[unk]), adv.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab-lu'tion (ǎb-lū'sh[unk]n)</label>, <desc>n. A washing ; cleansing.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab-nor'mal (ăb-nôr'mal)</label>, <desc>a. Contrary to rule, law, or system ; irregular. — Ab-nor'mal-ly, adv. — Ab-nor'mi-ty (-mĭ-t[unk]), n.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-board' ([unk]-bōrd')</label>, <desc>adv. In a vessel ; on board. — prep. On board of.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-bode' ([unk]-bōd')</label>, <desc>imp. & p. p. of ABIDE, v. i. & t. — n. State or place of residence ; dwelling.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-bol'ish ([unk]-b[unk]l'ĭsh)</label>, <desc>v. t. To do away with utterly ; to annul ; to destroy.</desc></p>
<p><label>Ab'o-li'tion (ǎb'[unk]-l[unk]sh'[unk]n)</label>, <desc>n. Doing away with finally and forever ; — applied particularly to slavery. — Ab'o-li'tion-ist, n. One who favors abolition, esp. of slavery.</desc></p>
<p><label>A-bom'i-na-ble ([unk]-b[unk]m'[unk]-n[unk]-b'l)</label>, <desc>a. Worthy of abhorrence ; odious ; hateful ; shocking. — A-bom'i-na-bly (-bl[unk]), adv.</desc></p>
</div3>
<ab type="note">ā, ē, ī, ō, ū, long ; ă, ĕ, ĭ, ŏ, ŭ, [unk], short ; sen[unk]te, [unk]vent, [unk]dea, [unk]bey, [unk]nite, câre, ärm, [unk]sk, [unk]ll, final, fẽrn, recent, ôrb, r[unk]de, f[unk]ll, ûrn, f[unk]d, f[unk]t, out, oil, chair, go, $ing, i[unk]k, then, thin.</ab>
</div2>
</div1>
</text>

Directories status

Directories, like city or school directories, usually refer to listings of people, businesses, or places for the purpose of making contact or other information available.

Sample Image

Click image to enlarge

Sample XML

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <?oxygen RNGSchema="tei_tite.rnc" type="compact"?> <!DOCTYPE text SYSTEM "file:/C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/crana/Desktop/TEI/Washington%20Univ/dtd/tei_tite.dtd"> <text xml:id="directory"> <!--EXAMPLE OF FRONT MATTER/PAGE CONTAINING ADVERTISEMENTS--> <front> <div1 type="section"> <pb n="npn" facs="directory1890_0000.jpg"/> <div2 type="advertisement"> <p>James A. Wright & Sons<lb/> Carriage Co.,<lb/>Established 1847</p> <figure rend="illustration"/> <p>Builders of fine light and heavy<lb/> Carriages,<lb/> Washington Ave. and 19th St. Repairing and Repainting a Speciality</p> </div2> <div2 type="advertisement"> <p>P.C. Murphy,</p> <figure rend="illustration"/> <p>Manufacturer of all kinds of <lb/> Traveling and Packing<lb/> Trunks,<lb/> Valises,<lb/> Traveling Bags, Satchels, &c<lb/> Wholesale and Retail,<lb/> Factory and Salesroom: Third and St. Charles Sts.<lb/> St. Louis, MO.</p> </div2> </div1> <!--EXAMPLE OF TITLE PAGE--> <titlePage> <pb n="npn" facs="directory1890_0006.jpg"/> <docTitle> <titlePart type="main"> GOULD'S<lb/> ST. LOUIS DIRECTORY <lb/> FOR 1890 <lb/> (FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 1ST, 1891) <lb/> </titlePart> <titlePart type="sub"> BEING A COMPLETE INDEX OF THE RESIDENTS OF THE <lb/> ENTIRE CITY, AND <lb/> A CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY, <lb/> TO WHICH IS ADDED AN APPENDIX CONTAINING <lb/> USEFUL INFORMATION OF THE CHURCHES, <lb/> BANKS, INSURANCE COMPANIES, CITY, <lb/> STATE AND OTHER MISCELLA- <lb/> NEOUS MATTER, ALSO, <lb/> A NEWLY REVISED <lb/> STREET AND AVENUE DIRECTORY. <lb/> PRICE, SIX DOLLARS. </titlePart> </docTitle> <docImprint> <pubPlace>ST. LOUIS:</pubPlace><lb/> <publisher>GOULD DIRECTORY CO., <lb/><address><addrLine>No. 813 Locust Street.</addrLine></address> </publisher><lb/> [Entered according to Act of Congress, <docDate>A.D. 1890, </docDate> by <name type="organization">Gould Directory Co..,</name> In the office of the <lb/> Librarian of Congress at <name type="place">Washington, D.C.</name>.] </docImprint> </titlePage> <!--EXAMPLE OF PAGE CONTAINING TEXT AND TABULAR DATA--> <div1 type="section"> <pb n="0009" facs="directory1890_0009.jpg"/> <head><smcap>ST. LOUIS IN</smcap> 1890</head> <p>This being the year regularly set apart, ... every essential particular.</p> <p>In 1886 we present in the directory ... population of the city will be seen by the following table:</p> <p><table rows="3" cols="2"> <row><cell>Official census, 1880:</cell> <cell>350,518.</cell></row> <row><cell>Our estimate, 1886:</cell> <cell>420,000.</cell></row> <row><cell>Our estimate, Jan. 1, 1890:</cell> <cell>496,224.</cell></row> </table></p> <p>Thus, it will be seen ...shows 43 per cent. increase.</p> <p>In arriving at the above conclusion...in <smcap>GOULD'S DIRECTORY</smcap> as follows:</p> <p> <table rows="6" cols="2"><row role="label"><cell><smcap>NAMES IN DIRECTORY</smcap></cell></row> <row><cell>1880:</cell> <cell>120,568.</cell></row> <row><cell>1886:</cell> <cell>141,008.</cell></row> <row><cell>1887:</cell> <cell>142,758.</cell></row> <row><cell>1888:</cell> <cell>149,730.</cell></row> <row><cell>1889:</cell> <cell>152,880.</cell></row> <row><cell>1890:</cell> <cell>155,400.</cell></row> </table></p> <p>The next most important ...show the enrollment for the </p> </div1> <!--EXAMPLE OF INDEX. USE FOR BUSINESS HEADINGS & STREET AND AVENUE DIRECTORY --> <div1 type="section"> <pb n="npn" facs="directory1890_0014.jpg"/> <head type="main">INDICES.</head> <head type="sub"><smcap>GENERAL INDEX. APPENDIX, ETC.</smcap></head> <!--page content here--> <div2 type="subsection"> <head>INDEX<lb/> TO<lb/> ADVERTISEMENTS</head> <!--page content here--> <pb n="32" facs="directory1890_0015.jpg"/> <cols n="2"/> <p><table rows="70" cols="2"> <row role="label"><cell></cell><cell>Page</cell></row> <row><cell>Bradbury & Jones</cell> <cell>1610</cell></row> <row><cell>Branch-Crookes Saw Co.</cell> <cell>Inside Front Cover</cell></row> <row><cell>Broadway Planning Mills</cell> <cell>1487 and 1679</cell></row> <!--listings continue...--> <row><cell>Giraldin & Cornet</cell><cell>opp. Additions, Alterations etc.</cell></row> </table></p> <cb/> <p><table rows="70" cols="2"> <row role="label"><cell></cell><cell>Page</cell></row> <row><cell>Gleason Charles H. & Co</cell> <cell>SideLines and opp. Additions, Alternations, etc.</cell></row> <row><cell>Glencoe Lime & Cement Co</cell> <cell>Bottom Corner Cards</cell></row> <row><cell>Goetz Chalres W. & Co</cell> <cell>Top Lines and 1600</cell></row> <!--listings continue...--> <row><cell>Mt. Olive & St. Louis Coal Co</cell><cell>Bottom Corner Cards</cell></row> </table></p> </div2> </div1> </front> <!--EXAMPLE OF CITY DIRECTORY PROPER/INDIVIDUAL LISTINGS--> <body> <div1 type="section"> <pb n="79" facs="directory1890_0076.jpg"/> <head>GOULD's St. Louis City Directory<lb/>1890</head> <div2 type="page"> <div3 type="abbreviations"> <head>ABBREVIATIONS</head> <!--content here--> </div3> <!--content here--> </div2> <div2 type="page"> <pb n="80" facs="directory1890_0077.jpg"/> <div3 type="advertisement"> <p>A.E. Faust, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Oysters, Sea Fish, Celery, Poultry, Game and all Foreign and Domestic Delicacies.</p> </div3> <div3 type="advertisement" rend="vertical"> <p>McKinley & Company, Vulcan and Big Muddy Coal, Laclede Building, S.W. Corner 4th and Olive Streets.</p> </div3> <div3 type="advertisement"> <p>Graham Paper Co.,<lb/> Wholesale Dealers in<lb/> Paper<lb/> 217 & 219 North Main Street.</p> </div3> <div3 type="entries"> <cols n="2"/> <l n="001">Abel Ludwig, stone. r. 506 Hickory </l> <l n="002">Abel Samuel T. foreman, r. 2616 Sheridan av. </l> <l n="003">Abel Valentine, clk. r. 1222 S. B'way </l> <!--listings continue--> <cb/> <l n="057"> ABER C. I. & CO. Aber (Charles I. and Chittenden), Warde B. Boots and shoes, 517 Locust </l> <l n="058">Aberer Richard, salesman Hart & Duff Hat Co. r. Belleville, Ill. </l> <l n="059">Abernathy Ferdinand D. r. 2029 Carr </l> <!--listings continue--> </div3> <div3 type="advertisement"> <p>Penn Mutual Life Ins. Co.,<lb/> All Policies nonforfeitable and incon-<lb/> testable after three years.<lb/> C Thaw & Co., Managers,<lb/> 203 North Third Street.</p> </div3> <div3 type="advertisement"> <p>Buy Your Furniture At J.H. Crane's. Fourth, Cor. Washington Ave.</p> </div3> </div2> <!--other pages here--> <!--EXAMPLE OF BUSINESS DIRECTORY PAGE--> <div2 type="page"> <pb n="1464" facs="directory1890_1461.jpg"/> <div3 type="advertisement"> <p>Tony Faust, Special attention paid to Banquets, Parties and Lunches for Residences.</p> </div3> <div3 type="advertisement" rend="vertical"> <p>McKinley & Company, Hard and Soft Coal, Laclede Building, S.W. Cor. 4th and Olive Sts.</p> </div3> <div3 type="entries"> <cols n="2"/> <!--listings here--> <div4 type="category"> <head type="main">Artistic Furniture</head> <head type="sub">(See also Furniture)</head> <l n="010"> LAMMERT FURNITURE CO. THE. 318 AND 320 N. B'way</l> </div4> <div4 type="category"> <head type="main">Artists</head> <head type="sub">(See also Painters, Portrait.)</head> <l n="011">Bange Charles, 903 Olive</l> <l n="012">Barnes Warren A. 328 Argyle av.</l> <!--listings continue--> <cb/> <l n="035">HUPPERT E. A., Life size Portraits in Oil or Crayon, Room 62, 904 Olive, St. Louis</l> <l n="036">JAESCHKE HENRY E., 2325 North Market, St. Louis</l> <l n="037">Kircheisen Norbert, 4156 Fairfax av. St. Louis</l> <!--listings continue--> </div4> </div3> <div3 type="advertisement"> <p>Buy your furniture at J.H. Crane's, Fourth, Cor - Washington Ave.</p> </div3> </div2> </div1> </body> <!--EXAMPLE OF APPENDIX PAGE--> <back> <div1 type="section"> <head type="main">APPENDIX.</head> <div2 type="page"> <pb n="npn" facs="directory1890_1720.jpg"/> <head type="sub">CITY GOVERNMENT<lb/> FOR THE YEARS 1889 TO 1993.</head> <p>ELECTION, April 2d, 1889.<lb/> INCORPORATED DECEMBER 9TH, 1822; ORGANIZED MARCH, 1823.<lb/> MAYOR'S OFFICE,<lb/> City Hall, 11th, Market and Chestnut.<lb/> Edward A. Noonan............Mayor.</p> <cols n="2"/> <div3 type="category"> <head type="main">Council.</head> <head type="sub">OFFICERS.</head> <p>Cyrus P. Walbridge, President; C.D. Comfort, Vice-President; A.B. Metcalfe, Secretary; Wm. H. Osmer, Asst. Secretary; H.R. Taylor, Sergeant-at-Arms.</p> </div3> <div3 type="category"> <head>Members of the Council</head> <p>Cyrus P. Walbridge, President;....</p> <!--listings continue--> </div3> </div2> <div2 type="page"> <pb n="1724" facs="directory1890_1721.jpg"/> <cols n="2"/> <div3 type="category"> <head type="main">Collector of Revenue</head> <head type="sub">E. wing Court House.</head> <l>Henry Ziegenheim, Collector.</l> <l>Tax Department, N. wing; License Department, E.wing.</l> </div3> </div2> </div1> </back> </text>

Drama status

Drama, in our context, refers to the written speech and stage directions for theatrical performances.

Sample Image

Click image to enlarge

Sample XML


<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<?oxygen RNGSchema="tei_tite.rnc" type="compact"?>
<!DOCTYPE text SYSTEM "file:/C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/crana/Desktop/TEI/Washington%20Univ/dtd/tei_tite.dtd">
<text xml:id="drama_1">
<div1 type="drama">
<pb n="1" fasc="Exhibit_1_drama.tif"/>
<head type="main">THE MERCHANT OF VENICE.</head>
<div2 type="castlist">
<head type="main">DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.</head>
<list type="castlist">
<cols n="2"/>
<item>The DUKE OF VENICE.</item>
<item>The PRINCE OF MOROCCO, suitors to Portia.</item>
<item>The PRINCE OF ARRAGON, suitors to Portia.</item>
<item>ANTONIO, a merchant of Venice.</item>
<item>BASSANIO, his friend, suitor likewise to Portia.</item>
<item>SALANIO, friends to Antonio and Bassanio.</item>
<item>SALARINO, friends to Antonio and Bassanio.</item>
<item>GRATIANO, friends to Antonio and Bassanio.</item>
<item>SALERIO, friends to Antonio and Bassanio.</item>
<item>LORENZO, in love with Jessica.</item>
<item>SHYLOCK, a rich Jew.</item>
<item>TUBAL, a Jew, his friend.</item>
<item>LAUNCELOT GOBBO, the clown, servant to Shylock.</item>
<cb/>
<item>OLD GOBBO, father to Launcelot.</item>
<item>LEONARDO, servant to Bassanio.</item>
<item>BALTHASAR, servants to Portia.</item>
<item>STEPHANO, servants to Portia.</item>
<item>PORTIA, a rich heiress.</item>
<item>NERISSA, her waiting-maid.</item>
<item>JESSICA, daughter to Shylock.</item>
<item>Magnificoes of Venice, Officers of the Court of Justice,
Gaoler, Servants to Portia, and other Attendants.</item>
<item>SCENE: <i>Partly at Venice, and partly at Belmont, the seat of
Portia, on the Continent.</i></item>
</list>
</div2>
<div2 type="act" n="1">
<head type="main">ACT I.</head>
<div3 type="scene" n="1">
<head type="main">SCENE I. <i>Venice. A street.</i></head>
<stage><i>Enter</i> ANTONIO, SALARINO, <i>and</i> SALANIO.</stage>
<sp>
<speaker><i>Ant.</i></speaker>
<lg>
<l>In sooth, I know not why I am so sad :</l>
<l>It wearies me ; you say it wearies you ;</l>
<l>But how I caught it, found it, or came by it,</l>
<l>What stuff 't is made of, whereof it is born,</l>
<l>I am to learn ; 5 <num n="5" rend="right">5</num></l>
<l>And such a want-wit sadness makes of me,</l>
<l>That I have much ado to know myself.</l>
</lg>
</sp>
<sp>
<speaker><i>Salar.</i></speaker>
<lg>
<l>Your mind is tossing on the ocean ;</l>
<l>There, where your argosies with portly sail,</l>
<ab type="printer's_number">B</ab>
</lg>
</sp>
</div3>
</div2>
</div1>
</text>

Encyclopedias status

Encyclopedias, often characterized and/or alphabetized by subject, contain entries that define, explain, or place in context a certain word, person, thing, phenomenon, or place.

Sample Image

Click image to enlarge

Sample XML

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<?oxygen RNGSchema="tei_tite.rnc" type="compact"?>
<!DOCTYPE text SYSTEM "file:/C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/crana/Desktop/TEI/Washington%20Univ/dtd/tei_tite.dtd">
<text xml:id="encyclopedia">
<!-- assuming <div1> is continued from previous page -->
<div1 type="encyclopedia">
<pb n="34" fasc="Exhibit_encyclopedia.png"/>
<!-- assuming <div2> is continued from previous page -->
<div2 type="pecora">
<!-- assuming <div2> is continued from previous page -->
<div3 type="section" n="i">
<p><i>Sivatherium</i> there are two pairs of such appendages, of which the hinder are large and were probably covered during life either with skin or thin horn. In the giraffes the separation of the horns from the skull may be a degenerate character.</p>
</div3>
<div3 type="section" n="2">
<p>II. In the Asiatic muntjac deer we find a pair of skin-covered
horns, or “pedicles,' corresponding to the paired horns of the
giraffe, although welded to the skull. From the summits of these pedicles arise secondary outgrowths, at first covered with skin, which (owing to the growth of a ring of bone at the base arresting the flow of blood) eventually dries up and leaves bare bone incapable of further growth. In the muntjac the bare bony part, or “antler,” is small in proportion to the skin-covered pedicle, and simple in structure; but in the majority of deer the antler increases in size at the expense of the pedicle—which dwindles—and in some species, like the Siamese deer (<ref target="fig1">fig. I</ref>), the sambar and the red deer, becomes very large and more or less branched. Owing to liability to necrosis, the permanent retention of such a mass of dead bone would be dangerous; and the antlers are consequently shed annually (or every few years), to be renewed the following year, when, till the animal becomes past its prime, they are larger than their predecessors. The periodical shedding is also necessary in order to allow of this increase in size. With the exception of the reindeer, antlers are confined to the males.</p>
<figure xml:id="fig1">
<graphic url="images/encyclopedia_fig1.png"/>
<ab type="caption"><smcap>FIG.</smcap> I.—Head of Siamese Deer (<i>Cervus schomburgkis</i>), showing antlers.</ab>
</figure>
</div3>
<div3 type="section" n="3">
<p>III. The third type of horn is presented by the American prongbuck, or pronghorn, in which bony processes, or "cores," corresponding to the horns of the giraffe, have acquired a horny sheath, in place of skin; the sheath being in this instance forked, and annually shed and renewed, although the core is simple. The sheaths are akin to hair in structure, thus suggesting affinity with the hairs surmounting the giraffe's horns. Female prongbuck may or may not have horns.</p>
</div3>
<div3 type="section" n="4">
<p>IV. In the great majority of “Hollow-horned Ruminants,”
such as oxen, sheep, goats and antelopes (<ref target="fig1">fig. 2</ref>), the horny sheath (or true “horn”) forms a simple unbranched cone, which may be compressed, spirally twisted, or curved in one or more directions, but is permanently retained and continues to grow throughout life from the base, while it becomes worn away at the tip. Rarely, as in the four-horned antelope, there are two pairs of horns. In many cases these horns are present in both sexes.</p>
<p>Dr H. Gadow is of opinion that the antlers of the deer, the horn-like protuberances on the skull of the giraffe, and the true horns of the prongbuck and other hollow-horned ruminants (<i>Bovidae</i>) are all different stages of evolution from a single common type: the antlers of the deer being the most primitive, and the horns of the <i>Bovidae</i> the most specialized. From the fact that the bony horn-core of the hollow-horned ruminants first develops as a separate ossification, as do the horns of the giraffe, while the pedicle of the antlers of the deer grow direct from the frontal bone, it has been proposed to place the hollow-horned ruminants (inclusive of the prongbuck) and the giraffes in one group and the deer in another. This arrangement has the disadvantage of separating the deer from the giraffes, to which they are evidently nearly related; but Dr Gadow's work brings them more into line. Whether he is right in regarding the hollow-horned ruminants as derived from the primitive deer may, however, be a matter of opinion. One very important fact recorded by Dr Gadow is that calves and lambs shed their horns at an early age. The <i>Bovidae</i> are thus brought into nearer relationship with the American prongbuck (the only living ruminant which sheds its horn-cover in the adult condition) than has generally been supposed.</p>
<p>The above-mentioned four types of skull appendages are generally regarded as severally characteristic of as many family groups, namely the <i>Giraffidae, Cervidae, Antilocapridae</i> and <i>Bovidae</i>. The two last are, however, much more closely connected than are either of the others, and should perhaps be united.</p>
</div3>
</div2>
<div2 type="girffidae">
<p><i>Giraffidae</i>.—In the <i>Giraffidae</i>, which include
not only giraffes (<i>Giraffa</i>) but also the okapi (<i>Ocapia</i>) and a number of extinct species from the Lower Pliocene Tertiary deposits of southern Europe, Asia and North Africa, the appendages on the skull are of type No. I., and may well be designated “antler-horns.” Another important feature is that the lower canine has a cleft or two-lobed crown, so that it is unlike the incisors to which it is approximated. There are no upper canines; and the cheek-teeth are short-crowned (brachyodont) with a peculiar grained enamel, resembling the skin of a slug in character. The feet have only two hoofs, all traces of the small lateral pair found in many other ruminants having disappeared.</p>
<p>The giraffes (<i>Giraffa</i>) are now an exclusively African genus, and have long legs and neck, and three horns—a single one in front and a pair behind—supplemented in some instances with a rudimentary pair on the occiput.</p>
<p>The okapi (<i>Ocapia</i>), which is also African but restricted to the tropical forest-region, in place of being an inhabitant of more or less open country, represents a second genus, characterized by the shorter neck and limbs, the totally different type of colouring, and the restriction of the horns to the male sex, in which they form a pair on the forehead; these horns being more compressed than the paired horns of the giraffe, and penetrating the skin at their summits (see <smcap>GIRAFFE</smcap> and <smcap>OKAPI</smcap>). Remains of extinct species of giraffe occur in the Lower Pliocene formations of Greece, Hungary. Persia, Northern India and China. From deposits of the same age in Greece, Samos and elsewhere have been obtained skulls and other remains of <i>Palacotragus</i> or <i>Samotherium</i>, a ruminant closely allied to <i>Ocapia</i>, the males of which were armed with a very similar pair of dagger-shaped horns. <i>Helladotherium</i> was a much larger animal, known by a single hornless skull from the Pliocene of Greece, which may be that of a female. In the equally large</p>
<figure>
<graphic url="images/encyclopedia_fig1.png"/>
<ab type="caption"><smcap>FIG.</smcap> 2.—Head of Grant's Gazelle (<i>Gazella granli</i>), showing horns.</ab>
</figure>
</div2>
</div1>
</text>

Journals or Serials status

Journals or serials (also called periodicals) may contain articles, poems, stories, or other forms of literature or information that are published periodically, usually every few months but sometimes more often.

Sample Image

Click image to enlarge

Sample XML

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<?oxygen RNGSchema="tei_tite.rnc" type="compact"?>
<!DOCTYPE text SYSTEM "file:/C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/crana/Desktop/TEI/Washington%20Univ/dtd/tei_tite.dtd">
<text xml:id="journal_1">
<titlePage>
<pb n="1" facs="Exhibit_1_Journal.png"/>
<docTitle>
<titlePart type="main">
American Journal of Public Health
</titlePart>
<titlePart type="volume">
Vol. X <lb/><date when="1920-01-00">JANUARY, 1920</date> <lb/>No. 1
</titlePart>
</docTitle>
<docImprint>
Official Monthly Publication of the <publisher>American Public Health Association</publisher><lb/>
<address><addrLine>169 Massachusetts Ave.,</addrLine></address> <pubPlace>Boston, Mass.</pubPlace><lb/>
Subscription price, $4 per year. American Public Health Association membership, including subscription, $5 per year.
</docImprint>
</titlePage>
<body>
<div1 type="article">
<head type="main">ADMINISTRATIVE HANDLING OF THE NARCOTIC ADDICT: ITS BENEFITS AND DANGERS.</head>
<author><smcap>ERNEST S. BISHOP</smcap>, M. D., F. A. C. P.,</author>
<address>
<addrLine><i>Clinical Professor of Medicine,</i></addrLine>
<addrLine><i>New York Polyclinic Medical School,</i></addrLine>
<addrLine><i>New York City.</i></addrLine></address>
<argument><p>Read before Food and Drugs Section, American Public Health Association, at New Orleans, La., October 27, 1919.</p>
<p>Dr. Bishop asserts again that narcotic drug addiction is a disease; the laws make it a crime. The appalling extent of illicit drug traffic is due largely to this mistake. Forcible control is a fundamental error. The existing laws make it hard for the physician to know where he stands in his treatment. Here is a strong plea for sensible reform.</p></argument>
<cols n="2"/>
<p>A VERY serious question is arising from the narcotic drug situation. It constitutes an important problem for immediate consideration. This question is the extent to which the narcotic or opiate addict should be given over for handling to administrative organizations,—and with this question, its corollary, the extent to which administrative supervision, regulation and control should be exerted or exercised over the individual sufferer from narcotic drug addiction and over the therapeutic procedure and professional judgment of the practitioner of medicine in the care of the sufferer from this disease.</p>
<p>At the time of passage of the early anti-narcotic restrictive measures with administrative provisions for the suppression of narcotic drug use, the general conception of the nature of addiction made the problem of its eradication seem <cb/>simple. Narcotic addiction, supposedly a “habit” or vice or indulgence, as it was then generally considered, seemed to require for its suppression merely forcible denial or prohibition of the means of supposed gratification.</p>
<p>The laws were passed and administered upon the above theories, and were followed by developments which were appalling. Among them were the practical temporary enforced abandonment of the addiction sufferer by the practitioner of medicine and the druggist, and the remarkable development and extension and organization of underworld or underground traffic with its attendant evils of smuggling, thievery, illicit manufacture and other criminality. I referred to this development in my papers before this Association last year. It is spoken of in the report of the special Federal Committee appointed by the Secretary</p>
<ab type="printer's_number">2</ab>
</div1>
</body>
</text>

Magazine status

Magazines contain articles and content similar to those of newspapers and journals, but they are often printed monthly as opposed to daily or every few months. As well, they generally contain more pictures and advertisements than newspapers or journals.

Sample Image

Click image to enlarge

Sample XML

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<?oxygen RNGSchema="tei_tite.rnc" type="compact"?>
<!DOCTYPE text SYSTEM "file:/C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/crana/Desktop/TEI/Washington%20Univ/dtd/tei_tite.dtd">
<text xml:id="journal_2">
<titlePage>
<pb n="npn" facs="Exhibit_2_Journal.png"/>
<docTitle>
<titlePart type="main">
</titlePart>
HARPER'S<lb/>
MONTHLY MAGAZINE
<titlePart type="volume">
VOL. CXVII <lb/><date when="1908-01-00">1908</date> <lb/>NO. DCXCVII
</titlePart>
</docTitle>
<docImprint>
Copyright, 1908, by Harper & Brothers. All rights reserved
</docImprint>
</titlePage>
<body>
<div1 type="article">
<head type="main">The Pressure of Light</head>
<head type="sub">A NEW SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY AND ITS WONDERFUL CONSEQUENCES</head>
<byline><i>BY WALDEMAR KAEMPFFERT</i></byline>
<cols n="2"/>
<p>WITH the aid of instruments that feel what our hands can never feel, and see what our eyes can never see, the modern physicist has critically analyzed the radiation that beats upon this Earth from the distant Sun. He has cast the solar effulgence into mighty mathematical scales, and has found that the Earth sustains a light-load of 75,000 tons. Startling as this intellectual achievement may be, it has been outdone by the ingenuity of the experimental scientist. Instruments have been devised that enable even our imperfect retinas to note the pressure of light,—instruments which offer that convincing objective evidence demanded by the scientifically uninformed man.</p>
<p>Granting that the Sun's light presses upon the Earth with a measurable force, what is the good of the discovery? Simply this: Ever since astronomy was reduced to a more or less exact science the men who watch the stars each night during their active lives have marvelled at some of the miracles that they beheld and have sought to explain them. Why, for example, does a comet's tail, in defiance of the laws of gravitation, invariably drift away from the Sun? What is the meaning of the great scarlet streamers or clouds that swim over the Sun, and of the wonderful gossamer corona that floats far beyond the Sun and is seen only during the few fleeting moments of a total eclipse? What is the zodiacal light, that shimmering fabric which is mysteriously spread on the western horizon during the clear evenings of winter and spring? What is the message of the Aurora Borealis and its leaping pillars, of which each arctic explorer brings back some new and marvellous tale? Widely different in character though these astronomical riddles may apparently be, the magic key by which they have all been unlocked is the pressure of light. The common solution of all these problems we owe to four brilliant scientists, a Russian, two Americans, and a Swede. It was a Russian, Lebedev, who first experimentally proved that light really does press upon the objects which it illuminates; it was the Americans, Nichols and Hull, who improved upon his method and confirmed his discovery; and it was the broad mind of a Swedish physicist, Svante Arrhenius, that cosmically applied the principles involved in light-pressure and brought into a simple harmony all this astronomical discord. New though these theories may be, they have been accepted by even the more conservative students of science.</p>
<p>Before we can hope to understand just why it is that the effect of solar radiation explains the vagaries of all these unrelated phenomena, we must understand how light-pressure acts. Because we are not flung from the Earth by a sunbeam, we may well infer that the pressure of light can sway individually only the</p>
</div1>
</body>
</text>

Manuscripts status

Manuscripts include any and all prose, letters, or other form that are handwritten. Note that this does not refer to typed or printed material that also has some corrections or minor notes made in hand. Those will be tagged within the general category of the printed source.

Sample Image

Click image to enlarge

Sample XML


<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<?oxygen RNGSchema="tei_tite.rnc" type="compact"?>
<!DOCTYPE text SYSTEM "file:/C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/crana/Desktop/TEI/Washington%20Univ/dtd/tei_tite.dtd">
<text xml:id="manuscript">
<div1 type="manuscript">
<pb n="88" fasc="Exhibit_manuscript.tif"/>
<lg>
<l>How he yt $$Word$$ was mayden marie</l>
<l>And $$Word$$ his loue floure and fiu$tifie</l>
</lg>
<lg>
<l>$$Word$$ yo$h his lyfe be queynt ye resemblaunce</l>
<l>Of him hay in $e so fressh lyflynesse</l>
<l>Yat to putte other men in remembraunce</l>
<l>Of his $sone & haue heere his lyfnesse</l>
<l>Do make to yis ende in sothfastnesse</l>
<l>Yat yer yt haue of him left yought & mynde</l>
<l>By yis $$Word$$ may ageyn him fynde</l>
<figure type="illustration"/>
</lg>
<lg>
<l>The y$$ged yt in yt churche been</l>
<l>Maken folk yenke on god & on his seyntes</l>
<l>Whan ye y$$ged yer be holden & seen</l>
<l>Were oft vnsyte of hem amsith restreynted</l>
<l>Of youghted gode Whan a ying depeyut is</l>
<l>Or enraised if men take of it heede</l>
<l>Thoght of ye lyfnesse it Wil in hym brede</l>
</lg>
</div1>
</text>

Monograph status

A monograph is a collected group of (generally prose) essays that refer to or expound upon one subject, usually by one author, and are published or bound together as a work of reference or study.

Sample Image

Click image to enlarge

Sample XML

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8">
<text xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0" xml:id="monograph">
<titlePage>
<pb n="npn" fasc="Exhibit_monograph.png">
<docTitle>
<titlePart type="main">
The Price of Progress
</titlePart>
<titlePart type="sub">
Legislative Program of the Board of Education; Calls for Authorization of Increased Revenues Through Tax Levies and Bond Issues, and Independence of the Board of Education in Fixing the Tax Rate for Educational Purposes, Subject Only to Maximum Rates Established by the Legislature
</titlePart>
</docTitle>
<docEdition>Monograph Number 2a<lb/>
Series of 1916-17</docEdition>
<docImprint>
Ordered Published by the <publisher>Board of Education</publisher><lb/>
<pubPlace>City of Minneapolis</pubPlace>, <docDate>November, 1916</docDate>
</docImprint>
</titlePage>
</text>

Newspaper status

Newspapers usually have daily publications of articles, advertisements, classifieds, and more that have to do with the happenings in an area.

Sample Image

Click image to enlarge

Sample XML


<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<?oxygen RNGSchema="tei_tite.rnc" type="compact"?>
<!DOCTYPE text SYSTEM "file:/C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/crana/Desktop/TEI/Washington%20Univ/dtd/tei_tite.dtd">
<text xml:id="newspaper">
<div1 type="newspaper">
<div2 type="article">
<pb n="A6" fasc="Exhibit_newspaper.tif"/>
<head type="main">Ultra-Orthodox Party Joins Israeli Coalition, Giving Olmert Majority Needed to Take Power</head>
<byline>By GREG MYRE</byline>
<cols n="3"/>
<p>JERUSALEM, April 30 — Israel's prime minister-designate, Ehud Olmert, signed up the ultra-Orthodox Shas party to his coalition on Sunday night, giving him enough parliamentary seats to establish the new government formally as soon as this week.</p>
<p>With Shas on board, Mr. Olmert and his partners command a solid majority, with 67 of the 120 seats in the Parliament. Mr. Olmert may still try to bring one or two more parties into his coalition, which would give him an even larger majority and guard against the possibility that any one party could leave the coalition and bring down the government.</p>
<p>Mr. Olmert says his top priority is to set Israel's borders daring the next four years, and that is likely to involve the removal of tens of thousands of Jewish settlers from the West Bank. Shas has generally opposed such Israeli concessions in the past and its support is by no means guaranteed in the future.</p>
<p>Shas draws its support from religious Jews of Middle Eastern descent, and it has sought increased spending for social programs that benefit its constituents, many of them poor. To advance his political plans, Mr. Olmert will have to meetat least some of the demands by Shas and the other partners, who have also called for increased social spending.</p>
<p>Mr. Olmert's centrist Kadima Party won the largest number of seats, 29, in the March 28 election. But the new government will consist of at least three other parties: Shas, with its 12 seats, the left-leaning Labor Party, with 19, and the Pensioners' Party, with 7.</p>
<p>It was not immediately clear when Mr. Olmert might present his coalition to Parliament for a vote of confidence, but it could be this week.</p>
<p>Israel's cabínet on Sunday approved a revised route for part of the separation barrier in the West Bank. The new path still incorporates several large Jewish settlements keep inside the West Bank, but takes up a bit less West Bank land than the previous route. The move appeared to be aimed at addressing objections from the United States and court challenges to the route in Israel.</p>
<p>"The changes are very important, and we are committed to making a supreme effort to complete the security fence everywhere as quickly as possible," Mr. Olmert told his cabinet before it voted on the changes.</p>
<p>The cabinet modified the route around a group of settlements, including Ariel, one of the largest in the West Bank with nearly 20,000 residents. This is one of the most contentious sections of the structure because it stretches farther into the West Bank in this area than anywhere else.</p>
<p>The Israeli government did not, however, immediately publish a map with the exact details of the new<cb/> route.</p>
<p>Groups opposed to the barrier described the changes as minor.</p>
<p>"For some Palestinians there might be a slight improvement of movement," said Sarit Michaeli, a spokeswoman for B'Tselem, an Israeli human rights group. "However, it is very hard to see how a barrier that extends so far into the West Bank is compatible with the creation of a Palestinian state that has territorial contiguity."</p>
<p>The cabinet also made some limited changes to the barrier route around Jerusalem. Mr. Olmert said Wednesday that he wanted gaps near Jerusalem completed as quickly as possible. He called for temporary fencing in areas where the barrier has not yet been completed and in areas where legal challenges have slowed building.</p>
<p>The government has faced sharp criticism from the Palestinians and much of the rest of the world over the barrier, which Israel began constructing in 2002 and describes as a security measure. Israel has redrawn the route on several occasions, reducing the amount of West Bank land on the Israeli side. Still,<cb/> under the newest plan, about 10 percent of the West Bank will be on the western, or Israeli, side.</p>
<figure>
<graphic url="images/newspaper_fig1.tif"/>
<ab type="caption">A Palestinian man, left, waiting to pass through the Israeli barrier at Abu Dis, on the edge of Jerusalem.</ab>
</figure>
<p>The Palestinians and their supporters strongly oppose the barrier on any part of the West Bank; which the Palestinians claim as part of a future state. They point to a ruling by the International Court of Justice in 2004, which said building the wall in the West Bank was a violation of international law.</p>
<p>The barrier, which consists of electronic fencing, concrete walls, patrol roads and watch towers, is about half-finished, Israeli officials say.</p>
<div3 type="article">
<head type="main">Israeli Troops Kill Palestinian</head>
<p>TULKAREM, West Bank, Monday, May 1 (AP) — Israeli soldiers shot and killed a Palestinian woman and wounded her two daughters on Monday when they fired on a West Bank house that an Islamic Jihad militant was hiding in, Palestinian officials and the army said.</p>
<p>When the militant refused to leave, soldiers tired on the house. The woman who was killed was identified as Etaf Zalat, 41.</p>
</div3>
</div2>
<div2 type="article">
<head type="main">China's Naming Of New Bishop Irks the Vatican</head>
<byline>By KEITH BRADSHER</byline>
<p>HONG KONG, April 30 — The state-controlled Catholic church in China elevated one of its top officials from priest to bishop on Sunday, despite objections from the Vatican.</p>
<p>There are two hierarchies of bishops in China, one selected by the underground church loyal to Rome and the other selected by the Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association, which Mao created to control the church in China.</p>
<p>The new bishop, Ma Yinglin, 40, is a top official of the patriotic association and the secretary general of its Council of Chinese Bishops. He will read the diocese of Kunming. In southwestern China.</p>
<p>Pope Benedict XVI has placed a priority on reaching an understanding with mainland China that would allow greater religious freedom for the country's Roman Catholics. But China, which has had informal contacts with the Vatican in recent years on ways to restore ties, has objected to giving the Vatican a say in the selection of bishops for dioceses.</p>
<p>Cardinal Joseph Zen Ze-kiun, who grew up in Shanghai and was appointed by Benedict this spring, is an intermediary in efforts to restore diplomatic relations between Beijing and the Vatican.</p>
<p>On Saturday, he warned the state-controlled church in a statement that $to conduct the ordination without the Holy See's approval is to sabo$age intentionally Sino-Vatican relations." On Sunday, he said that the Vatican had wanted at least a delay before Father Ma was made bishop.</p>
<figute type="advertisement"/>
<figure type="advertisement"/>
</div2>
</div1>
</text>

Poetry status

Poetry, or verse, has many different constructions but for the most part is differentiated from prose by more frequent line breaks for aesthetic and rhythmical reasons.

Sample Image

Click image to enlarge

Sample XML


<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<?oxygen RNGSchema="tei_tite.rnc" type="compact"?>
<!DOCTYPE text SYSTEM "file:/C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/crana/Desktop/TEI/Washington%20Univ/dtd/tei_tite.dtd">
<text xml:id="poetry_1">
<div1 type="poetry">
<pb n="6" fasc="Exhibit_1_poetry.tif"/>
<lg type="stanza">
<l>Speaks, and in accents disconsolate answers the<lb/>wail of the forest.</l>
</lg>
<lg type="stanza">
<l rend="indent(1)">This is the forest primeval ; but where are the<lb/>hearts that beneath it</l>
<l>Leaped like the roe, when he hears in the wood-<lb/>land the voice of the huntsman?</l>
<l>Where is the thatch-roofed village, the home of<lb/>Acadian farmers, —</l>
<l>Men whose lives glided on like rivers that water<lb/>the woodlands,</l>
<l>Darkened by shadows of earth, but reflecting an<lb/>image of heaven?</l>
<l>Waste are those pleasant farms, and the farmers<lb/>forever departed!</l>
<l>Scattered like dust and leaves, when the mighty<lb/>blasts of October</l>
<l>Seize them, and whirl them aloft, and sprinkle<lb/>them far o'er the ocean.</l>
</lg>
</div1>
</text>

Transcripts status

Transcripts are a written record (usually typewritten) of dictated or recorded speech, such as court transcript records.

Sample Image

Click image to enlarge

Sample XML


<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<?oxygen RNGSchema="tei_tite.rnc" type="compact"?>
<!DOCTYPE text SYSTEM "file:/C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/crana/Desktop/TEI/Washington%20Univ/dtd/tei_tite.dtd">
<text xml:id="transcripts">
<div1 type="transcripts">
<pb n="1" fasc="Exhibit_transcripts.tif"/>
<head type="main">MESSAGE.</head>
<opener>
<salute><i>To the Senate and House of Representatives:</i></salute>
</opener>
<p>I submit for the information of Congress the report of the commission appointed by me to carry on the work authorized under act of appropriation of June 25, 1910, which made available $100,000—</p>
<p>To enable the President, by the employment of accountants and experts * * * to more effectively inquire into the methods of transacting the public business * * * with a view of inaugurating new or changing old methods * * * so as to attain greater efficiency and economy therein, and to ascertain and recommend to Congress what changes in law may be necessary to carry into effect such results of his inquiry as can not be carried into effect by Executive action alone.</p>
<p>Pursuant to this authority a preliminary investigation was instituted under the Secretary to the President with a view to determining what ground should be covered and what staff and organization would be required. This preliminary inquiry was carried on until March, 1911, when, at my request, the term of the appropriation was extended to June 30, 1912, and $75,000 was added.</p>
<p>Of this $175,000 made available for the first two years the amount expended for the preliminary inquiry was $12,252.14, leaving $162,747.86 available for the 15 months remaining after March 8, 1911, when the commission was organized. By special message of January 17, 1912, I requested that $250,000 be made available for the current fiscal year. Only $75,000, however, was appropriated, and to this was attached a restriction to the effect that not more than three salaries could be paid in excess of $4,000 per annum, thereby forcing a complete reorganization of the commission. At the same time the Congress by special resolution requested a report from the commission with recommendations on the organization and work of the Patent Office—this to be submitted to Congress not later than December 10, or a little over three months after the resolution was passed. Although $10,000 additional was appropriated for this purpose, it was impossible within the time to organize a special staff which could do such a highly technical piece of work. A further limitation to constructive work has been found in the short period</p>
<ab type="note">72734°—H. Doc. 1252, 62-3—1</ab>
</div1>
</text>

Other status

Other refers to any form, structure, or content that is not covered for the most part by any of the other Content Types.

Apex CoVantage, LLC All rights reserved. © 2010